The Amsterdam Centre for Conflict Studies (ACCS)

Affliates

Laurens Bakker

The research of Laurens Bakker focuses on paramilitary groups in Southeast Asia (particularly Indonesia and the Philippines) and their economic, social, legal and political influence. Bakker is especially interested in relations between paramilitary groups and their funders and their role  in resource conflicts.
Laurens Bakker 

Ursula Daxecker

Ursula Daxecker is an assistant professor of international relations at the University of Amsterdam, specializing in conflict processes and political violence. She joined the department in 2013. Current research projects involve electoral violence, maritime piracy, and terrorism. 
Ursula Daxecker

Marlies Glasius

Marlies Glasius is professor in International Relations at the Department of Politics, University of Amsterdam. She has four interrelated research interests: international criminal justice, global civil society, authoritarianism and human security. Her interest in international criminal courts relates to their interaction with their socio-political environment (or the lack of it), and the ways in which understandings of justice and legitimacy are constructed. Recent work on global civil society looks at what we term the 'square movements of 2011', considering differences and commonalities between the square occupations by the Occupy movement, the anti-austerity protests in Southern Europe, and the Arab Spring. She is also currently leading a larger research project on the nature and sustainability of authoritarianism in relation to globalisation of ICTs, associationalism, and people movement. Previous work on human security has attempted to operationalize the term so as to help enable a real shift in policymaking.
Marlies Glasius

Erella Grassiani

Erella Grassiani lectures at the department of anthropology and does research at the department of Human Geography, Planning and International Development Studies. She has done extensive anthropological work on Israeli soldiers who serve in the Occupied Palestinian Territories. Currently she is working within a project on privatization and globalization of security with a focus on Israel/Jerusalem (ERC funded). She is a board member of Peace and Conflict Studies in Anthropology (PACSA), a network of EASA. She is also co-founder of gate48, a platform for critical Israelis in the Netherlands, and has organized numerous many conferences on militarization, anthropology and conflict and activism.
Erella Grassiani

Joyeeta Gupta

Professor Joyeeta Gupta works on environment and development in the global south and looks, inter alia, at how resource scarcity (e.g. water, phosphorous), inequality and the challenge of sharing environmental utilization space (e.g. greenhouse gas emission allowances) from local to global level leads to multiple layers of conflicts between actors and countries at different levels of governance. The research also focuses on how such conflicts can be diffused.
Joyeeta Gupta

Anja van Heelsum

Dr Anja van Heelsum is assistant professor at the Department of Political Science of the University of Amsterdam and has been affiliated with the Institute of Migration and Ethnic Studies (IMES) since 1997. Her main area of interest lies in a multidisciplinary approach to migration and ethnic studies and the field of conflict resolution & governance, where insights from psychology, political science, sociology and anthropology meet. Topics of her research include:  ethnicity and ethnic relations, ethnic conflicts and prejudice,  local policies of cities concerning the integration of immigrants for instance concerning neighbourhood tensions and radicalisation in cities. Her current project entitled EURISLAM concerns integration issues around Muslims in Europe. 
Anja van Heelsum

Freek Jansen

Freek Janssens is a PhD Candidate in the programme group Transnational Configurations, Conflict and Government at the Amsterdam Institute for Social Science Research.. His research focusses on urban food markets as spaces where "politics" occur. In particular, he looks at moments of conflict in rapidly changing urban neighbourhoods, and the dynamics of resistance that are developed in and around markets in these areas. Freek has conducted ethnographic fieldwork in London, Amsterdam and Istanbul, as well as on the island of Sardinia, and has recently published a Special Issue of the journal ‘Built Environment’ on ‘Marketplaces as Urban Development Strategies.’
Freek Jansen

Anne de Jong

Dr Anne de Jong is an assistant professor Anthropology of Conflict with a region expertise on the Middle East (Palestine, Lebanon and Bahrain). Prioritizing subaltern everyday perspectives, her research interest centers on violence - nonviolence, radical activism and social movements, human rights, oppression and resistance, queer action and anti-colonial struggles. For her PhD (2011, SOAS) she conducted a 19 month fieldwork research in the Occupied Palestinian Territories including East-Jerusalem and Gaza. She currently works on 1) human rights defenders and resistance in Bahrain and, 2) on the intersectionality of anti-racism and gender & sexuality activism in Beirut. Born from the necessity of doing 'fieldwork under fire', research ethics and innovative methodology has grown central to her work (De Jong, 2011; 2015) which is also reflected in her teachings.
Anne de Jong

Yves van Leynseele

Dr Yves van Leynseele holds an MSc and PhD degree in Development Sociology from Wageningen University on politicised struggles for land and novel institutional arrangements in land reform and environmental governance. He is currently employed as lecturer at the Geography, Planning and International Development Studies group at the University of Amsterdam, where he teaches and coordinates courses at the MA and Research Master's programmes of International Development Studies (IDS) on theories and debates in IDS, research methods and skills in the professional practice of International Development Corporation. His research follows an actor-oriented approach with an emphasis on production of new spaces of development, the agency of development brokers (state and non-state) and emergent Community-Public-Private-partnerships in land reform and nature conservation. This includes a focus on the privatisation of the responsibility for development and how expert knowledge informs local planning and decision-making processes. Related research interests include place-based development, livelihood strategies, property arrangements, and methodological approaches to studying articulation in environmental governance.
Yves van Leynseele

Mieke Lopes Cardozo 

Dr Mieke Lopes Cardozo is currently employed as assistant professor at the Amsterdam Institute for Social Science Research of the University of Amsterdam. She is the coordinator of the 'IS-Academie' co-funded research project of the University of Amsterdam and the Dutch  Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Her work is focused in the area of Education and International  Development. Mieke teaches in the BA and MA academic programme International Development  Studies, and is specialized in the field of Education and International Development. She is a visiting fellow at the University of Auckland (2013), University of Sussex (2012-2014), and the University of Malta (2014). She leads a Research Consortium on Education, Social Justice and Peacebuilding in collaboration with the University of Sussex and the University of Ulster. She is currently also involved in an EU funded Life Long Learning development programme for a joint Masters on Global Education Policies (GLOBED). Mieke is a board member of the Netherlands Association for Latin American and Caribbean Studies (NALACS) and the Amsterdam Research Centre on Gender and Sexuality (ARC-GS).
Mieke Lopes Cardozo 

Martien Kuitenbouwer

Martien Kuitenbrouwer is programme director for the Public Mediation Programme at the UvA. She has worked in public administration and public governance for nearly fifteen years. The past eight years, she was president of the board of Amsterdam-West. She worked with Dr David Laws at the UvA during those years, developing a close working relationship between research and practice in order to improve both education on public disputes as well as current government practice. In addition, she works as a management consultant for Lysias Group, dealing with complex issues around decentralisation and local government and administration. She is also a member of several advisory boards and committees. Martien Kuitenbrouwer holds degrees in History of International Relations from the UvA as well as a degree in Social and Economic Policy from the London School of Economics and Political Science.
Martien Kuitenbrouwer

David Laws

David Laws (Ph.D. 1998, Massachusetts Institute of Technology) is an associate professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Amsterdam.  Before coming to Amsterdam, he worked at the Department of Urban Studies and Planning and the Sloan School of Management at MIT and with the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School. His research focuses on the relationship between negotiation and conflict resolution, public administration, and democratic governance.  He has worked as a consultant for the New York Stock Exchange, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Air National Guard, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, and the Ministry of VROM.
David Laws

Vivienne Matthies-Boon

Given her interdisciplinary background, Dr Vivienne Matthies-Boon is particularly interested in the interrelation between Critical Theory (Frankfurt School) and Middle Eastern Studies. With regard to Critical Theory she is particularly influenced by Jurgen Habermas's theory of deliberation, but also Axel Honneth and Nancy Fraser's theories of recognition. Focusing on Egypt in particular, but also with an explicit interest in Palestine and Syria, she explores the demands and struggles for social justice and recognition within these countries. Within this broader framework, her research contains three distinct but interrelated strands of inquiry. Firstly, she examines the impact of personal and collective experiences of political trauma (suffered during struggles for recognition) on political mobilization, social violence and emotional wellbeing - and thus outlines how the personal and political are intricately connected.  Secondly, she researches the extent to which these struggles for recognition have articulated themselves in alternative programmes of social, political and economic development. Within these enquiries she works closely with a variety of Egyptian scholars, activists and organisations. And lastly, she is interested in the modes of knowledge production on the Middle East - and how this particular affects political programmes such as democracy promotion. This research forms part of the Critical Middle Eastern Studies section of BRISMES, run in cooperation with Dr Jeroen Gunning (Durham University) and Dr Andrea Teti (University of Aberdeen). In addition to academic undertakings, she also frequently writes on Egyptian affairs for non-specialist outlets such as Aswat Masriya (the Egyptian Reuters Thompson) and OpenDemocracy.net.
Vivienne Matthies-Boon

Virgine Mamadouh

Dr Virginie Mamadouh is an associate professor of Political and Cultural Geography and part of the AISSR programme 'Geographies of Globalization' specialized in European integration (as multiscalar territorial arrangement) and geopolitics. She is currently involved in a FP7 programme called Mobility and Inclusion in Multilingual Europe (MIME) with a project on the (political) geographies of urban multilingualism.
Virginie Mamadouh

Gerben Noteboom

Gerben Noteboom’s research activities focus on 1) resource conflicts in Southeast Asia and especially Indonesia. These concern conflicts over land, natural resources and mining in Kalimantan and rural Java; 2) social conflict and poverty. Conflicts between landless people and landowners, policy makers and local people, newcomers (migrants) and established both in rural and urban areas. 3) Ethnic conflict (between Madurese migrants and Dayak/Malay in Kalimantan).
Gerben Nooteboom

Polly Pallister-Wilkins

Dr Polly Pallister-Wilkins is an assistant professor of Conflict Resolution and Governance and International Relations in the Politics Department at the University of Amsterdam. Her work is broadly focused on themes of security, border practices and (post)colonialism within which she is a specialist on the politics and sociologies of walls, fences and barriers and humanitarian practice in the governance of populations. This research builds on her doctoral research at SOAS, University of London that focused on the Separation Barrier in the Occupied Palestinian Territories.
Polly Pallister-Wilkins

Michelle Parlevliet

Michelle Parlevliet (MA political science, MA international peace studies) has been working on the nexus of human rights and peace work for 15+ years in various capacities and contexts. She is currently a guest researcher at the Faculty of Law (UvA), working on the completion of a PhD which builds on her practical experience and focuses on the interaction of human rights and conflict resolution in the practice of civil society organisations and independent state institutions in, notably, South Africa, Northern Ireland, Nepal and Zimbabwe. She serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Human Rights Practice and does practical assignments as facilitator & trainer for various organisations, including Conciliation Resources, swisspeace, German development aid, and the United Nations. 
Michelle Parlevliet

Dennis Rodgers

Dennis Rodgers is Professor of International Development Studies. A social anthropologist by training, his research focuses broadly on issues relating to the political economy of development, including in particular the dynamics of conflict and violence in cities in Latin America (Nicaragua, Argentina) and South Asia (India). Much of his work involves the study of youth gangs – he has been conducting longitudinal ethnographic research on Nicaraguan gang dynamics since 1996 – but he has also worked on urban inequality, the politics of socio-spatial segregation, participatory governance processes, urban crime reduction, as well as on the epistemology of development knowledge. His future research plans include developing multi-scalar comparative gang studies as well as, more broadly, re-thinking the relationship between conflict, violence, and development, both historically and in the contemporary era.
Dennis Rodgers 

Imrat Verhoeven

Dr Imrat Verhoeven is assistant professor of Public Policy at the University of Amsterdam. His main research interest are policy related conflicts, focussing on governmental activism (where lower tiers of government behave like social movements or actions groups against higher tier of government), the framing of emotional appeals during conflicts, and the role of media. In most of his research he applies interpretive methods and sometimes he employs mixed methods. His doctoral thesis Burgers tegen beleid (Citizens against policy) has been nominated for the Van Poeljejaarprijs (a prize for the best doctoral thesis in public administration in The Netherlands and Belgium). He currently works on the ‘gasquakes’ in Groningen, together with Tamara Metze.
Imrat Verhoeven

Nanke Verloo

Dr Nanke Verloo looks at conflicts that emerge in the urban environment. Specifically she is interested in the way local urban governments and welfare organizations deal with instances of urban conflict and how urban citizens develop informal and formal ways to contest local policy making, planning, and identity politics. She developed a narrative analysis framework that looks into the changing meaning of spaces, places, and identities in the urban environment through processes of conflict.  Nanke uses ethnographic research methods and narrative interviews. Her research takes place at the boundary of theory and practice as it provides theoretical insights and repertoires for practice. In 2015 she successfully obtained her PhD with the accomplished title of Cum Laude. 
Nanke Verloo

Floris Vermeulen

Floris Vermeulen is associate professor at the department of Political Science and co-director of the Institute for Migration and Ethnic Studies (IMES) of the University of Amsterdam. His research focuses on the civic and political participation of immigrants at the local level; the social, political and legal effects of increasing religious diversity in Europe; and on preventive policies against violent extremism in different European cities.
Floris Vermeulen

Lior Volinz

Lior Volinz is a PhD candidate at the School for Social Science Research (AISSR) of the University of Amsterdam. His research, as part of the research group 'Public-Private Security Assemblages', focuses on the privatization process of security and military functions in Jerusalem and its relations to differentiated citizenship and precarious residency rights. Lior holds a Joint MA degree in Social and Cultural Anthropology from Stockholm University and the University of Ljubljana (2013, cum laude). In his Master's thesis, Lior explored how anti-war activists in Israel and Serbia, societies facing an intractable conflict, can negotiate and challenge state-sanctioned constructs of national identity and collective memory. He earned his BA in Media and History from Tel Aviv University (2010), and the IB diploma from the United World College of the Adriatic in Duino, Italy (2006).
Lior Volinz

Don Weenink

Dr Don Weenink's prime research interest is the micro-sociology of violence. This entails the study of what actually happens in violent interactions. One question he is working on is how changes in the emotional states of the opponents are related to situational asymmetry. For instance by analysing how supportive groups impact the course of the interaction by increasing feelings of emotional domination in one party, or by degrading the opponent. Another question is how and to what extent the various cultural meanings expressed in violence are related to the emotional intensity of the interaction. In his Group Violence research programme (funded by an ERC Consolidator Grant) these issues are studied by focusing on how group behaviour affects antagonistic and violent situations.
Don Weenink

Published by  AISSR

26 July 2016